Archaeology Past may hold clues to climate's future

Discussion in 'Archaeology' started by mscbkc070904, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. mscbkc070904

    mscbkc070904 Premium Member

    Past may hold clues to climate\'s future

    Just ask the ancient Egyptians.

    Harvey Weiss, professor of archaeology at Yale University, says climate change was a fact of life for earlier civilizations. From pharaohs to the medieval Vikings, swift and sometimes violent changes in weather patterns sparked mass migrations and technological innovations like irrigation.

    "Those episodes proved to be the single most important stimulus for the major transformations in human history," said Weiss, who digs through the traces of vanished empires for evidence of these climatic events.

    Climate change was first proposed as a consequence of human activity in 1895. A Swedish chemist theorized that burning fossil fuels like coal might emit enough carbon dioxide to warm the planet. But natural climate variation, caused by fluctuations in the Earth's orbit and other natural cycles, wasn't thought to occur on a time scale perceptible to humans -- until recently. (The science debate)

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  2. Bleys

    Bleys Phoenix Takes Flight Staff Member

    Definitely food for thought

    I saw this section in the article Mike:

    Definitely something that requires additional research.

    B.
     
  3. bodebliss

    bodebliss The Zoc-La of Kromm-B Premium Member

    The problem with the so called global warming theories is we are in an ice epoch right now. The climate we call normal is abnormal by Earth's standards. 80% of Earth's history there was no ice at the poles. The cool down started 55-45 million years ago and culminated in an ice epoch which has had many ice ages, but that is not normal.These ice epochs come around every 150 million years and the causes are still being debated.

    I believe we will eventually go back to a condition of no ice at the poles. At one time there were forests all the way to the South Pole. Green leafy forest at the South Pole and they survived though there is 3 months of darkness.

    http://dsc.discovery.com/news/briefs/20041101/leaves.html
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3036272.stm

    55 million yrs ago no Ice covered poles.

    http://www.michigandaily.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/10/05/41628104d24ae