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Physical Science Metallic Gasses

Discussion in 'Physical Science' started by junior_smith, Aug 31, 2004.

  1. junior_smith

    junior_smith Premium Member

  2. amantine

    amantine Premium Member

    The phase of a substance depends on a few factors. One is temperature, another is pressure. Enough pressure or a low enough temperature will make gasses fluids or enough solids.

    Now, hydrogen is a special gas. If we were just to look to the electron shells of the hydrogen atom, it belongs in the group of Na, K, Li, etc. The electrons of an atom reside in different shells, different groups of electron with different orbits. The electron is hydrogen is in 1s^1. The first number is most important, because in chemical reactions we only look at the shells with the highest number. Li has 1s^2 2s^1, but we only look at 2s^1. And Li is a metal, so hydrogen should have some metallic properties.

    Now, those rules have a lot of exceptions and hydrogen is one of them. It is not metallic, but it still has some metallic properties. Under extreme pressures, like inside a planet, it can form a metallic grid. The gas stays in this phase, as long as the pressure and temperature stay the same.
     
  3. Zsandmann

    Zsandmann Premium Member

    And a metal and thus metallic grid is when atoms are closely compacted with maximum nearest neighbors, and the electrons in the outer shell freely jump from one atom to another, so for hydrogen at any given time the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle states each atom will have one electron but it can be anywhere in the field and the one elctron could belong to any of the atoms in the metal.

     
  4. oddtodd

    oddtodd Premium Member

    here is a cool link about actuall metalic glass that has amazing thermo , conductive , and superconductine properties . It reminds me of that transparent aluminium in the Star Trek (long live Scotty !!) movie with the whales , check it out

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/03/980331074950.htm
     
  5. JcMinJapan

    JcMinJapan Premium Member

    What was interesting is that this technology is being used to collect the Sun particles on the Genesis project. Advancement is Wonderful!
     
  6. pineappleupsidedown

    pineappleupsidedown Premium Member

    Is your link bad junior, or is my comp just being weird?

    ---pineapple
     
  7. pineappleupsidedown

    pineappleupsidedown Premium Member

    I got it to work finally!

    Now, lets say you inhale some of this metallic gas. What then? could you get metal posioning? die from an MRI? what? This is sortof a scary thought.

    ---pineapple
     
  8. Mizar

    Mizar Premium Member

    HRmm rather old...

    Pine I doubt if you inhaled it you would die in an MRI

    Because think of all the metals you have in your body to begin with.. Potsaaium, iron, zinc etc...

    That is intresting solid hydrogen mmph never thought about that. Great info Amantine.