Physical Science Interesting thought about inertia

Discussion in 'Physical Science' started by Waxy cheesecake, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. Waxy cheesecake

    Waxy cheesecake Premium Member

    I have this book called "the physics of star trek" thats explaining that matter bends spacetime says that if someone were to move forward in their ship and create a inertial force equal too gravity on earth, that person would not be able too tell the diference from the inertial force and earth on gravity.

    A couple weeks after reading that a thought popped into my head, what if there is no difference between that inertial force and the gravity on earth? What if by accelerating that fast you are creating a gravitional force? That would mean that instead of your MASS increasing the closer you get too the speed of light,
    your "inertial" gravity would increase.

    :wow:
    So, what do you guys think?
     
  2. Waxy cheesecake

    Waxy cheesecake Premium Member

    Did I get something completely wrong and people are too shocked about it that they haven't told me yet?
     
  3. junior_smith

    junior_smith Premium Member

    i think the original thing has either more to do with centripetle force (sorry for spelling) or it may have to do with less obvious things pulling you with gravity.
     
  4. Waxy cheesecake

    Waxy cheesecake Premium Member

    So I take it that my orignal assumption that I made some incredibly obvious mistake was right. Oh well, I'm prone too do that.:D
     
  5. amantine

    amantine Premium Member

    Congratulations, you figured out Einstein's principle of equivalence all by yourself. That principle says that in a single point, there is no difference between gravity and acceleration. This is the way General Relativity describes accelerations, as gravitational forces.

    For collections of multiple points, there can be a difference between gravity and acceleration. A point 1 m above your location feels a slightly different gravitational force, because it is further from the earth.
     
  6. Waxy cheesecake

    Waxy cheesecake Premium Member

    I didn't know he had a principle of equivalence at all. I thought there was only GR and SR. Hmmmmm I'm going too have too learn alot more about him before I turn in my report on him.
     
  7. amantine

    amantine Premium Member

    The equivalence principle is an important part of general relativity.