Physical Science Anti-matter

Discussion in 'Physical Science' started by JcMinJapan, Sep 4, 2004.

  1. JcMinJapan

    JcMinJapan Premium Member

    Now, this article goes on to be able to tell if we contact an alien world, how could we tell over radio signals if they were anit-matter or not..... Well, this brought a question to me..... If that world were completely opposite and we did contact them by radio signals, isn`t there a good chance that their signals would be opposite as well. Which lead me to contemplate two things happening....

    1. Once the signals touched each other, couldn`t there be some sort of destruction that could occur at the point of contact? (Personally, I do not think so)
    or
    2. Wouldn`t they just cancel each other out and then there would be no sound at all. So, in essence, we could never actually contact them.

    I think 2 is more likely, as we are able to now dampen sound electronically by using the opposite frequency or something like that. So, essentially wouldn`t their signals do the same thing?
     
  2. amantine

    amantine Premium Member

    To be honest, I don't know what would happen. I don't think interference will be a problem, because it is very unlikely that we would send out exactly the signal to cancel out their signal.

    That leaves 1 or 3 (nothing happens and we can simply recieve the signal). The photon is its own antiparticle. I think, but I'm not sure, that this means that no destruction will occur and we can simply recieve the signal.
     
  3. oddtodd

    oddtodd Premium Member

    I think it would depend on whether radio waves are considered "matter" , I think electronicaly speaking , we should be able to recieve it somehow . If it were to travel in waves , then it would be like looking for a cosine wave as opposed to a sine wave JMO . oddtodds2cents
     
  4. oddtodd

    oddtodd Premium Member

    I was just reading thru that article and further down it has a question posed by Richard Feynman (coolest physisist of all time IMO) and he posed this question to his students

    "Alien screening :

    In his 1961-62 lectures, the Caltech professor Richard Feynman had his students imagine a distant alien civilization on an antimatter planet. If we were to contact them through radio, Feynman asked, how would we tell that they were made of antimatter?

    Although the charges would all be reversed, their anti-hydrogen, anti-carbon, etc. would weigh as much as our elements. The energy levels would be the same as well. So their chemistry textbooks would be identical to ours.

    There are, however, certain high-energy interactions that in our world behave as if left-handed, whereas in the antimatter world behave as if right-handed. But how do you tell someone which way is "left" over an interplanetary telephone? Feynman’s point was that you can’t, if all you can do is compare physics experiments.

    The fact that antimatter acts as a mirror image of matter is called charge-parity (CP) symmetry. After Feynman’s lecture, experimentalists observed a few rare occasions where this symmetry was not upheld, and therefore, one could tell whether the alien on the other line was matter or antimatter . There are, however, certain high-energy interactions that in our world behave as if left-handed, whereas in the antimatter world behave as if right-handed. But how do you tell someone which way is "left" over an interplanetary telephone? Feynman’s point was that you can’t, if all you can do is compare physics experiments.

    The fact that antimatter acts as a mirror image of matter is called charge-parity (CP) symmetry. After Feynman’s lecture, experimentalists observed a few rare occasions where this symmetry was not upheld, and therefore, one could tell whether the alien on the other line was matter or antimatter
    " frome space.com

    It seems that he beleived that radio waves were not part of antimatter in his posed question . So I don't think what we have would cancel any radio waves out .. just matter that would come in contact anti-matter . The article also states that a few observations have been bade that enable them to identify phenomena previously assumed unavailable by observation.
     
  5. Derek

    Derek ■֎؜♫■ Staff Member

    Hmmm, I could see the sound waves cancelling each other,our world is currently bombarded with so many different wavelengths/ frequencies, I think that this could be possible.